Who is the last classic rock band?

Who is the last classic rock band?

  • Nirvana

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Pearl Jam

    Votes: 1 12.5%
  • Red Hot Chili Peppers

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Guns N Roses

    Votes: 3 37.5%
  • Foo Fighters

    Votes: 2 25.0%
  • The White Stripes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • The Black Keys

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Tool

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other (please post)

    Votes: 2 25.0%
  • We haven't seen them

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    8

King Kamala

Integral Poster
Post @Gary made in Nu-Metal thread retriggered a topic I've thought a lot; what was the last classic rock band?


Bands I almost included in the poll but decided against; Rage Against The Machine, Nine Inch Nails (both too "eclectic" to get played on most classic rock stations right now afaik although that will probably change once Gen Xers become prime demographic for classic rock stations), and Wilco (Idk if I've ever actually heard them on any radio station besides the local adult alternative station)
 

HarleyQuinn

Laugh This Off... Puddin'!
Staff member
I voted Foo Fighters only because they came a few years after Pearl Jam (for obvious reasons) and have stayed relevant through the modern day. I like the White Stripes & Black Keys but feel both are a little less broad appealing.
 

Laz

0101100101
I disagree with all of these bands being called "classic rock" on the basis that they each fit into other niches (grunge, post-grunge, prog, industrial, etc.). The term "classic rock" will forever refer to that Woodstock-to-Reagan era for me, denoted by heavy influences from blues and country western.

I guess I kinda just talked myself into voting for GNR, actually.
 

Alfie

Alfie
The term "classic rock" will forever refer to that Woodstock-to-Reagan era for me,
Yeah, this thread is confusing the shit out of me. It's like how nothing released after 1962 or so is a 'golden oldie', or the New Pop movement being 40 years old at this point.

Anyway I voted GnR on the basis of my own litmus test: does it inspire middle-aged men in the pub to launch into tirades about real music being dead? Can't see it with any of the others
 
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King Kamala

Integral Poster
Wouldn't it seriously be like Kings of Leon or Mumford & Sons?

Correct answer is the Strokes.
Your NYC bias is showing, Epic. The Strokes are like the ‘00s Black Crowes to the rest of the country. Maybe I should’ve included Black Crowes in the poll but I don’t think they’re relevant enough to be considered a CLASSIC ROCK BAND over just a band occasionally played on classic rock radio.

I would put Kings of Leon in the same status as Black Keys, White Stripes, and Killers (who I definitely should have considered for the poll) as bands that aren’t classic rock yet but will probably get there in 10 years (assuming radio still exists) once more boomers die off and millennials are the ones programming classic rock stations.

Mumford & Sons is probably too wimpy to be considered classic rock but will definitely make their close relative classic hits stations in 10-15 years.

Every Xer gets mad when I call Nirvana a classic rock band but classic rock radio here has been playing them since around the time of “You Know You’re Right”. Pearl Jam gets played most though of the grunge bands cause they kind of fit in better with the roation.
 

AboveAverage484

Integral Poster
"Classic Rock" is fairly restricted to pre-early 1980s, although there were many artists popular in that decade (Springsteen, Tom Petty, Mellencamp, U2, Seger, to name a few) that had songs that are played on "classic rock" stations. I think the definite "line in the sand" was the early 90s alternative rock explosion. I wouldn't consider any band that came along after that to be "classic rock" but more the "new" classic rock (i.e. alternative rock). I think Pearl Jam is the correct answer as they stayed truest to the arena and stadium rock "sound" of their predecessors and influences while also appealing to the older listeners ("boomers") that made up the biggest part of classic rock's fanbase.

Also, I think it was Byron that claimed "Interstate Love Song" was the last great "American" rock song and it kind of fits as the death knell to the "classic rock" sound as you heard it, along with a decent part of Pearl Jam's catalogue, being played on dinosaur rock stations as early as the 2000s.
 

cobainwasmurdered

CWM
Staff member
I mean you can force anything you want into the classic rock definition just by using a time basis. The last time I was forced to listen to it my classic rock station played certain hip hop songs from the 90s!
 

AboveAverage484

Integral Poster
I mean you can force anything you want into the classic rock definition just by using a time basis. The last time I was forced to listen to it my classic rock station played certain hip hop songs from the 90s!

I think you have to place certain restrictions to it or better define what "classic" rock is. Is it:

1. An actual sound or style defined by a certain playing in a manner that (mostly) appealed to late sixties through early eighties listeners, focusing on big guitars, loud anthems, ballads, etc. without playing too fast or hard or without greatly deviating from the "norm?" (metal, grunge, punk, etc.)

2. Or is it simply the last commercially successful mainstream rock group, not particularly defined by sub-genre of rock and having a "rolling" timeline, wherein "classic" is merely referring to groups or music that is older than, say, 7-10 years?
 

King Kamala

Integral Poster
Anyone who liked this discussion should definitely read this book on the slow death of classic rock.

One of interesting points made is there is rock music that is classic but not classic rock music (I think Velvet Underground may have been the example used for the category ) and mediocre bands like REO Speedwagon and Foreigner who aren’t classic but are definitely classic rock.
 
I'm basing this on acts that are routinely played on classic rock stations and still putting out records, so the answer is easily Blue Oyster Cult.

Each decade has its own sound for radio rock songs and as such I can only go by how the sound makes me feel. 90s had grunge and post-grunge (the dolls that goo), 80s had the Moz voice, 70s were ELO to Boston, etc. It's all about what transports you, I suppose. It's all too subjective based on how much stock you put in radio play and personal nostalgia.
 
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