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Online Epic for the Summer

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The Crow - A retrospective
« on: April 20, 2013, 02:29:25 AM »
http://www.thewrap.com/movies/article/tom-hiddleston-early-talks-lead-relativitys-crow-reboot-exclusive-86876

So Tom Hiddleston is the favorite right now to play Eric Draven in the remake. I can get behind that casting. After they tried to court Bradley Cooper and Mark Wahlberg of all people, I was really fearing the worst but it looks like they're starting to get their shit together

So, what are your thoughts about "The Crow" films?

The first one is one of my all-time favorites. I think the editing is pretty choppy but it's understandable considering their lead star died halfway through filming. Yeah, like "Nightmare Before Christmas", it's become one of the poster movies for the adolescent crowd but that doesn't take away the brilliant performances from the grossly underrated Michael Wincott and David Patrick Kelly and the excellent soundtrack to boot.

City of Angels was pretty bad but it's kind of cool to see a young Thomas Jane and Iggy Pop stumbling throughout the film acting like a goof.

Salvation actually wasn't that terrible. Eric Mabius wasn't bad and people really didn't give him a chance because they felt the main character HAD to have long hair (one of the dumbest criticisms of any character I've ever heard). and Fred Ward was a decent villain. Kirsten Dunst is just kind of there but she knew this was just a paycheck for her as her star was on the rise at this point.

Wicked Prayer is by far the worst movie in the series. I wonder at the time why a movie with this cast (David Boreanez, Tara Reid, Dennis Hopper, Macy Gray) would get a direct to DVD release but upon viewing, you understand why. Terrible CGI and effects, the most uninteresting characters, intentionally bad acting, and awful production values.

I would rate the series 1, 3, 2, 4.

Has anyone seen the series "The Crow: Stairway To Heaven" that aired briefly in the late 90's? I never saw it but the entire series is on DVD and some episodes are on YouTube.






Offline Big Beard Booty Daddy

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2013, 03:33:53 AM »
The Crow is my all-time favorite comic book movie. I've seen it so many times. I also love the soundtrack. Iggy Pop was actually the basis for Draven in the comic book according to James O'Barr, at least the way he looked and moved. I got a chance to meet O'Barr at the New York Comic Con a couple years back, and it was, for sure, one of the highlights. The best thing about City Of Angles is that after I saw it in the theater, I got to sneak into Independence Day and watch the end of that movie since my parents went to see that instead of The Crow.

I've never seen the other movies and have no interest in it.

I'll check out the new version to see how it is.
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Offline 2GOLD

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2013, 03:35:04 AM »
The Crow series was a guilty pleasure for me because it was cheesy and silly but it was just fun to watch. I wouldn't seek it out but if I saw it in a bargain bin? I'd grab it.

And the only Crow movie I could stand was part one. Brandon Lee really showed a lot of charisma. Part two was so terrible, I don't know what it was trying to accomplish.

Just do one with Sting, only let him act like the crazy Joker Sting. That movie would make billions.


Offline RedJed

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2013, 07:54:10 AM »
Who is producing/writing/directing the reboot anyway? I'm more concerned with that end of it versus the casting to be honest.

I love the original and as CD said, incredible soundtrack, one of the best, if not the best, alternative movie soundtrack of all time IMO.

I have no desire to really see a remake but would rather like them to consider a proper followup to the original as none of those sequels did it any justice; in fact it probably hurt the lore and mythos of the Crow character as a whole. Hopefully they do what many reboots have done which is fuse it to be a kinda-remake with some of the familiar themes and points of the original but then create a much deeper and rich backstory and also fuse in some new and original stuff to elevate the franchise.

Offline Avid Warehouse Enthusiast

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2013, 10:29:03 AM »
I absolutely adore the first one, herald its soundtrack, and agree with Reine's ranking of their quality.

I saw the show, but it turned what is the quintessential brooding and self-loathing hero into just another guy. Part of the first one is the depressing mood all throughout it, from the tone of each scene to the set design itself, but the show...well, most shots were very brightly lit, and it always seemed to be sunny and gorgeous outside.

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2013, 01:38:32 AM »
Who is producing/writing/directing the reboot anyway? I'm more concerned with that end of it versus the casting to be honest.

Edward R. Pressman (who produced the original) is producing and spanish director Francisco Javier GutiƩrrez is directing (it will be his American film debut).

Fun fact: Nick Cave wrote an early draft of the script.

Offline Jingus

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2013, 03:28:11 AM »
The first Crow was a damn fine gothic action movie, something you didn't get much of back in 1994.  Great cast, great soundtrack, and a genuinely ambitious artist for a director.  It even had characters and dialogue that were worth a damn.  But let's face it, this movie would be totally and utterly forgotten if Brandon Lee hadn't died while making it. 

City of Angels is sickeningly bad.  Indescribably bad.  A fucking crime against art.  I could literally sit here and list, like, at least two dozen really terrible individual errors it made.  But I don't have time right now.  Let's just say that most of the movie is directly stolen from the first film, except done much worse, and the small amount of new content is even shittier.  Nobody except Iggy Pop even tried to "act", and the leading man clearly can't speak a single fuckin' word of English (which, in an English-language film, is a bit of a handicap).  And it's a crime how goddamn awful the villain is, considering he's the same guy who unforgettably played the weird bounty hunter in the "Objects in Space" episode of Firefly.  Fuck all this.  The pretty-cool soundtrack is literally the only saving grace of the whole mess. 

Never saw Salvation

I think Wicked Prayer gets an unfairly bad rap.  Of course it's not a GOOD movie, but with City of Angels sitting right there and stinking up the franchise something awful, we're working on a sliding scale of quality here.  I'm always a sucker for an amazing bizarro-world cast, and this is one of the bizzaroest that I've ever seen.  Some of it is unintentionally entertaining, like Dennis Hopper clearly having no fucking idea what any of his lines mean (for some damn reason, they hired the easy rider and then gave him a script full of nothing but Ebonics).  It's also just plain nice to see David Boreanaz in a movie which isn't the worst fucking movie in the world, because pretty much every other film he's ever been attached to was always inevitably the worst fucking movie in the world. 

I tried to watch Stairway to Heaven precisely one time, and promptly turned it right the fuck off.  The scene was literally a scene from The Incredible Hulk, version Bixby: some bad guys are harassing some victims in a (very brightly lit) "bad part of town", and then the Crow hulks out and beats up the bad guy.  Yes, in this version, THE DUDE GROWS CROW MAKEUP WHEN HE GETS ANGRY.  I was flabbergasted.  Never tried any of it ever again.  And the whole thing had the production values and general look of an episode of Highlander or any other shitty action show from that time period. 

Offline Harley Quinn

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2013, 03:46:07 AM »
The first Crow was a damn fine gothic action movie, something you didn't get much of back in 1994.  Great cast, great soundtrack, and a genuinely ambitious artist for a director.  It even had characters and dialogue that were worth a damn.  But let's face it, this movie would be totally and utterly forgotten if Brandon Lee hadn't died while making it. 

City of Angels is sickeningly bad.  Indescribably bad.  A fucking crime against art.  I could literally sit here and list, like, at least two dozen really terrible individual errors it made.  But I don't have time right now.  Let's just say that most of the movie is directly stolen from the first film, except done much worse, and the small amount of new content is even shittier.  Nobody except Iggy Pop even tried to "act", and the leading man clearly can't speak a single fuckin' word of English (which, in an English-language film, is a bit of a handicap).  And it's a crime how goddamn awful the villain is, considering he's the same guy who unforgettably played the weird bounty hunter in the "Objects in Space" episode of Firefly.  Fuck all this.  The pretty-cool soundtrack is literally the only saving grace of the whole mess.

Yeah, how about we not face it, hmm?  The first Crow movie would be remembered even if Brandon Lee had lived precisely because the soundtrack kicked ass, it had a memorable enough villain (in actor Michael Wincott), and had a great set design/mood/atmosphere to the entire film.  Would it be remembered as a classic? No but it would be remembered as it is.  A good movie drenched in Gothic atmosphere with solid acting.  For most people, that is all that is needed.

City of Angels wasn't good and I'd even agree to call it below average but I wouldn't call it "sickeningly bad".  Especially after you praise fucking Wicked Prayer after it immediately.  Iggy Pop at least makes it somewhat watchable even if the plot is pretty lame, the acting bad, etc.  It's a decent idea buried in poor execution.

Nothing you said at all in your writeup makes Wicked Prayer not sound shittily awful.  It is a dreadful, awful movie and made even worse than COA because it has a few decent actors in it.  Eric Furlong and Tara Reid are even worse than Mia Kirshner (whom I adore but admit she's pretty one note).  David Boreanez is what he is acting wise and doesn't do much with the movie either.  The plot of the film is even dumber and more retarded than COA.  At least COA stupidly, yes, tried to tie into the first movie with Sarah's character and all.

Offline Edwin

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2013, 05:29:07 AM »
I would have liked The Crow more if Ernie Hudson had played all the parts.

Offline Jingus

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2013, 06:56:13 AM »
Yeah, how about we not face it, hmm?  The first Crow movie would be remembered even if Brandon Lee had lived precisely because the soundtrack kicked ass, it had a memorable enough villain (in actor Michael Wincott), and had a great set design/mood/atmosphere to the entire film.  Would it be remembered as a classic? No but it would be remembered as it is.  A good movie drenched in Gothic atmosphere with solid acting.  For most people, that is all that is needed.
It was just a good movie.  One which became way more iconic than countless other good movies which didn't have an infamous on-set death, or makeup which became so instantly iconic.  It just happened to hit the right-place right-time zeitgeist and Lee's demise made it legendary.  I dunno if there would ever have been a full franchise if his dying didn't focus SO much attention on the first film.  At the time, the movie wasn't even that big a hit; it made fifty million bucks domestically, but it's sitting below stuff like The Little Rascals and Wolf and The Specialist and Disclosure on 1994's box office list.  Outside of teenager goths, the movie took a while to become such a cult favorite. 

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City of Angels wasn't good and I'd even agree to call it below average but I wouldn't call it "sickeningly bad".  Especially after you praise fucking Wicked Prayer after it immediately.  Iggy Pop at least makes it somewhat watchable even if the plot is pretty lame, the acting bad, etc.  It's a decent idea buried in poor execution.
It was a bad idea right from the beginning.  David S. Goyer's shitty script was a total do-over of the first movie, a blatant retread, except with villains whose motivations are even more poorly explained.  The ONLY new idea is that this Crow isn't happy about the idea of going back into his grave after his roaring rampage of revenge is complete; and even that is completely ignored in favor of more shots of the Crowbike zooming away into huge clouds of yellow smoke.  And yeah, Iggy Pop was fun, but he was onscreen for maybe five minutes.  The rest of the cast were uniformly awful, regardless of whether they were talented or not. 

Yes, I really did think Wicked Prayer was way better than City of Angels.  Better cast, better villain, better action scenes, better pacing, better cinematography, better special effects, better attempt at trying to do something different with the Crow mythos (although the attempt did ultimately fail).  It's still ultimately a crappy movie, but I didn't feel anywhere near as pissed off at the end of that movie as I did at the end of CoA.  The second movie had a much better soundtrack than the fourth one, but that's appropriate for a movie made by a music video director who never made another feature film before or since. 

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Eric Furlong and Tara Reid are even worse than Mia Kirshner (whom I adore but admit she's pretty one note). 
Can't agree with that.  At least Furlong and Reid were trying to act.  Which is kinda like Verne Troyer trying to dunk a basketball (or trying to act), but still.  I usually really like Mia Kirshner, but she was absolutely fucking worthless in this movie.  Seemed like she didn't want to be there and didn't care if everyone else could tell.  When she blankly mumbles "That's why they call me the mistress of pain" while applying the shittiest-looking fake tattoo ever, it's a line reading so terrible that I'm glad she gets killed off later.  Didn't even try to match the personality of the actress playing that part in the first movie, either. 

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At least COA stupidly, yes, tried to tie into the first movie with Sarah's character and all.
It was supposed to tie in even more heavily than that; the original script had Michael Wincott's character from the first film being resurrected as some kind of Anticrow for a final showdown.  Fortunately, even the dumb assholes who made City of Angels realized that wasn't a good idea. 

I would have liked The Crow more if Ernie Hudson had played all the parts.
But that could apply to, like, every movie ever.  "I would have liked The Women more if Ernie Hudson had played all the parts" is also true. 

Offline Harley Quinn

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2013, 09:07:49 AM »
It was just a good movie.  One which became way more iconic than countless other good movies which didn't have an infamous on-set death, or makeup which became so instantly iconic.  It just happened to hit the right-place right-time zeitgeist and Lee's demise made it legendary.  I dunno if there would ever have been a full franchise if his dying didn't focus SO much attention on the first film.  At the time, the movie wasn't even that big a hit; it made fifty million bucks domestically, but it's sitting below stuff like The Little Rascals and Wolf and The Specialist and Disclosure on 1994's box office list.  Outside of teenager goths, the movie took a while to become such a cult favorite.
 

You cannot keep saying it was a good movie, had all of these positives, etc. and proclaim it WOULDN'T be a cult classic the way it is today.  Too many of the positives would have stayed relevant even if Lee had not died.  I'm also pretty sure a sequel at least would have been talked about, if not even made, if Lee had survived as well.  Probably wouldn't have been a 5 film series though.

It was a big hit in 1994.  For a $23 Mill budget, it made $50 Million domestically as you said and finished #24 out of all films in 1994 and #10 among R-Rated movies that year.  Wolf had massive names in Jack Nicholson and Michelle Pfeiffer starring it so of course it did well.  The Little Rascals was HUGE among kids, period.  It finished as the #5 PG-Rated movie that year and I remember trailers being all over the place advertising wise.

I just don't see how the above films are a knock to the success of The Crow on its own merits.

As it is, City of Angels made nearly $18 Million on a $13 Million budget so financially it was a very small success.

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Yes, I really did think Wicked Prayer was way better than City of Angels.  Better cast, better villain, better action scenes, better pacing, better cinematography, better special effects, better attempt at trying to do something different with the Crow mythos (although the attempt did ultimately fail).  It's still ultimately a crappy movie, but I didn't feel anywhere near as pissed off at the end of that movie as I did at the end of CoA.  The second movie had a much better soundtrack than the fourth one, but that's appropriate for a movie made by a music video director who never made another feature film before or since.
 

I liked the cast more in COA, even if most of the acting was pretty bad.  Vincent Perez was decent and the atmosphere (and soundtrack as you mentioned) were better in COA than Wicked Prayer.  Blame Miramax's re-editing for making COA so reminiscent of the 1st movie and Goyer's subsequent avoidance.

Wicked Prayer may "look" better because of a competent director but given the choice of watching them both, I'd much rather watch City of Angels.  The story, in some ways, is darker and more tragic in COA as well (come on, a Dad has his kid killed!).

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Can't agree with that.  At least Furlong and Reid were trying to act.  Which is kinda like Verne Troyer trying to dunk a basketball (or trying to act), but still.  I usually really like Mia Kirshner, but she was absolutely fucking worthless in this movie.  Seemed like she didn't want to be there and didn't care if everyone else could tell.  When she blankly mumbles "That's why they call me the mistress of pain" while applying the shittiest-looking fake tattoo ever, it's a line reading so terrible that I'm glad she gets killed off later.  Didn't even try to match the personality of the actress playing that part in the first movie, either.

Agree to disagree I guess.  Just really quick as for the personality at the end, I was of the opinion that she just got really jaded as hell and it's not like she was super ecstatic in the first one either.  Shelly & Eric are dead, she nearly died herself, and the place she works and lives in is just as bad a shit hole as Detroit.  Also she is like nearly 10-15 years older.  People change.

Offline Avid Warehouse Enthusiast

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2013, 10:22:53 AM »
You know what made The Crow a cult classic? All the reasons that Jingus said it would've been remembered. That's how cult classics are made: a movie that, for whatever reason, is extremely memorable despite its box office success or lack thereof. Thinking that The Crow wouldn't be considered a classic without Brandon Lee's death (though it can't be argued that his on-set death definitely leads more weight to the movie as a whole) is like saying The Dark Knight would have been considered just another Batman movie if not for Heath Ledger's death, or that Enter the Dragon wouldn't be the action classic it is if Bruce Lee didn't die during his dubbing session (just to bring it all back).

The movie is iconic because it hit hard on all the right notes at just the right time.

Offline Jingus

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2013, 03:27:14 AM »
Me and Harley's argument is already getting circular, so I'mma abandon it, except for this detail:

As it is, City of Angels made nearly $18 Million on a $13 Million budget so financially it was a very small success.
Actually, that means it probably lost money at the box office.  The budget figures never count marketing costs, which is insane because advertisements often cost like an extra 30% of the official budget.  And the ticket sales aren't actually how much money the studio made: the theaters take their own percentage of the ticket price, and that number is constantly changing.  So basically we have no idea how much money any movie actually made; the studios are infamous for claiming that every movie loses money, so they don't have to pay back-end residuals and income taxes and other shit and they're basically stealing money directly from everyone else. 

Talking about a movie's grosses-vs-budget is awfully strange, when you think about how little information that actually gives us.  The flat dollar amount of ticket sales doesn't even tell us how many people actually watched the damn thing.  And sales for DVDs and other ancillary markets are rarely reported, despite the fact that it's well-known that most movies only turn a profit after they hit home video.  Why the hell do we focus so much on stuff like "Michael Bay's Exploding Titties cost $300,000,000 to make and earned $300,000,000.01 this week, thus the film is profitable!" when the numbers are practically meaningless? 

Online Epic for the Summer

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #13 on: April 23, 2013, 03:33:13 AM »
All 4 Crow films are on Netflix so if anybody hasn't seen them, now would be a good time. Even if the sequels range from mediocre to downright terrible.

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2013, 03:45:58 AM »
...and I'm gonna have to go with Harley on this one. COA is bad but Wicked Prayer is unwatchable. I will take Vincent Perez's strong accent over Furlong's inability to emote any day of the week.

Offline cobainwasmurdered

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2013, 03:54:16 AM »
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Me and Harley's argument is already getting circular, so I'mma abandon it, except for this detail:



We did it Stinger. We did it. I told you that we could defeat him. That's as close as he'll ever get. You finally did it Stinger. You made the Jingus abandon an argument. And if it wasn't for me goading you into it you wouldn't have done it. I told you you could trust me Stinger. I'll always have your back. WOOO~


Offline Harley Quinn

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2013, 08:39:24 AM »
Me and Harley's argument is already getting circular, so I'mma abandon it


Offline Avid Warehouse Enthusiast

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2013, 10:30:42 AM »
Is there a way to embed "We Are the Champions" in here?

Offline Smues

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #18 on: April 25, 2013, 06:44:51 AM »
No.

I want Jimmy Fallon to be dead. That doesn't make me a bad person.

Offline HSJ

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #19 on: April 30, 2013, 05:34:48 AM »
Looks like Alexander Skarsgard is in the running to play Craven.

This I don't hate...


DTF

Offline Avid Warehouse Enthusiast

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #20 on: April 30, 2013, 10:04:00 AM »
Is there a way to embed "We Are the Champions" in here?
YES.

Offline CletusVanDamme

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #22 on: May 01, 2013, 06:12:30 AM »
I don't totally hate Skarsgard playing the lead. He at least looks the part (I don't watch True Blood).

Online Epic for the Summer

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #23 on: May 05, 2013, 04:40:49 AM »
http://www.aintitcool.com/node/62264

We (sort of) have our lead.

Offline Jingus

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #24 on: May 06, 2013, 06:10:54 AM »
One thing I don't get: why are they remaking the first movie with another story about Eric Draven?  Unless they do something like an incredibly faithful adaptation of O'Barr's comic (which I fuckin' doubt), there's no point to making it Draven again.  This story can happen to pretty much anyone, that's the whole point of the mythos.  And none of the casual fans even know the guy's name, they just call him "the Crow" like it's his proper title.  Also: still waiting for a female Crow, dammit.  Summer Glau would be all over that shit. 

Offline 2GOLD

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #25 on: May 06, 2013, 06:15:15 AM »
Well if the current rumored script review is found out to be true, they are definitely NOT doing a faithful adaption of the comic. IF it is true, it will become a giant fucked up mess.

Offline Edwin

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #26 on: May 06, 2013, 06:18:28 AM »
Because "Will Hambone" isn't as good a name for an invincible goth guy killing dudes in the dark.  Or maybe TWIIIIIIST Eric Draven is the villain and the hero is the real Crow this time!

OH YEAH
YEAH
OH YEAH

THIS SEASON ON ENTOURAGE

Offline Avid Warehouse Enthusiast

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #27 on: May 06, 2013, 08:20:38 AM »
Unless they do something like an incredibly faithful adaptation of O'Barr's comic (which I fuckin' doubt), there's no point to making it Draven again.
 
I may be in the minority here, but the movie is so much better than the original comic that it's ridiculous. There were maybe only one or two aspects of the comic I preferred (the "dream sequence" parts with the skeleton cowboy and the horse, and the "can I have my shoes now" revenge), and the movie just nailed it out of the park by being faithful to its source but straying from it only to enhance the story.

Agreed, though. Remaking the first one, plot and all, is dumb, especially considering some of the other Crow comics and books (namely O'Barr's own Dead Time and the oft-overlooked The Lazarus Heart by Poppy Z. Brite) could be adapted fairly easily. Hell, The Lazarus Heart alone could be made into a solid flick, especially given that the protagonist and his murdered lover were a same-sex couple. Wanna cash-in on the current teen angst and movement among them? Voila.
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This story can happen to pretty much anyone, that's the whole point of the mythos.  And none of the casual fans even know the guy's name, they just call him "the Crow" like it's his proper title.  Also: still waiting for a female Crow, dammit.  Summer Glau would be all over that shit. 
There was a female Crow in the TV show, but we already went over how the show was p. terrible. If they went female, I'd probably want somebody with some better range than Summer, though. It may just be me, but she does absolutely nothing for me.

Offline 2GOLD

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #28 on: May 06, 2013, 08:29:45 AM »
Some of the things from the "rumored script review":

Eric Draven is murdered cop dating Shelley. They met in a super religious orphanage and Eric is so religious, he quotes Bible passages. Of course, this is just the start of things that made me go, alrighhhttt. We do the usual memory thing and then I guess, Eric finds out he has no reflection in the mirror so he paints his face so he can see it. Oh and he now can walk through walls and other ghost things. There is a villain named Mulligan and it seems Eric finds a hell train and pets Cerebus.

Keep in mind, this is just some of the rumored things about the script. I have no idea how close any of that is to the graphic novel but I know it is nowhere CLOSE to the original film. However, if it is true, it would explain why Bradley Cooper, Alexander Skarsgard and Tom Hiddleston turned into Luke Evans.

Offline Avid Warehouse Enthusiast

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #29 on: May 06, 2013, 08:34:16 AM »
The train comes right from the source material, but that's it. I can't remember if the facepaint was ever explained in the book beyond "James O'Barr loved Alice Cooper," but the movie made it a point to show that Shelly loved harlequin masks and that's why Eric paints his face like one.

If any of that is true (beyond the train), then wow...way to miss the fucking point entirely.

Offline 2GOLD

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #30 on: May 06, 2013, 08:38:24 AM »
Was he super religious? Because I'm confused why someone who was super religious would be a) anywhere near a Hell train and b) petting a hound of hell.

Offline Avid Warehouse Enthusiast

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #31 on: May 06, 2013, 03:39:18 PM »
Not that I could tell. He seemed more into spirituality than anything else.

I almost want a Crow: Dead Time adaptation. It was another O'Barr story, and I thought the plot itself was better than the original Crow comic, even if it lacked the mood and emotion of the original.

Offline Jingus

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #32 on: May 07, 2013, 01:18:10 AM »
I may be in the minority here, but the movie is so much better than the original comic that it's ridiculous. There were maybe only one or two aspects of the comic I preferred (the "dream sequence" parts with the skeleton cowboy and the horse, and the "can I have my shoes now" revenge), and the movie just nailed it out of the park by being faithful to its source but straying from it only to enhance the story.
They're so utterly different in tone that, despite being the exact same story, they're... well, not the same story.  Like, compare King Lear with Kurosawa's Ran.  Despite remaining surprisingly faithful to the general story of the source material, the adaptation runs off into very different territory.  The book was certainly way more nihilistic than the movie, which seemed to at least hold out some sort of hope for happiness beyond the oblivious peace of the grave.  The book was a hell of a lot more nasty with its violence and the generally scummy feeling of the setting, too. 

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If they went female, I'd probably want somebody with some better range than Summer, though. It may just be me, but she does absolutely nothing for me.
I wish I could make a snarling sound exactly like Cujo right now. 

Eric finds out he has no reflection in the mirror so he paints his face so he can see it.
That's actually kind of a cool idea.  Kind of.  If it weren't buried in a pile of bad ideas, which it certainly is. 

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I have no idea how close any of that is to the graphic novel
It ain't the same fuckin' ballpark, it ain't the same league, it ain't even the same fuckin' sport. 

Was he super religious?
Not even remotely.  He was more of a literary guy than anything, he was constantly making references or allusions to various semi-obscure philosophical texts. 

Online Epic for the Summer

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #33 on: January 11, 2019, 02:35:07 AM »
Just wanted to bump this to say that it looks like the remake is all but dead. Jason Momoa was confirmed for Eric Draven for the longest time and seemed excited about it. He even talked it up in interviews and did a little pre-production but there was too much inactivity so he walked. Colin Hardy (The Nun) is out as director as well.

I'm fine with this never been made.

Offline Bladelock

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Re: The Crow - A retrospective
« Reply #34 on: January 11, 2019, 06:40:27 AM »
I am too. The first movie is fantastic and totally holds up, but it's so entrenched in the 90's that I can't see a modern version of The Crow working at all.