Author Topic: It's Real to Me - The Documentary Thread  (Read 9832 times)

Description:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Saints_Fan_H

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 4,984
Re: It's Real to Me - The Documentary Thread
« Reply #100 on: March 05, 2019, 03:10:23 PM »
"Bayou Blue'' on Amazon Prime's streaming service is about the serial killer from my home town who killed over 20 men from the late 90s - 2006. A lot of the people interviewed I either know or know people that know them. The prosecutor actually helped me work through my first ever speeding ticket (after talking to me like dog shit for 15 minutes before he went good guy and softened on me).

It's not well done, at all. It leaves out a lot of information. But for now it's the only comprehensive production on the case. I do like it doesn't glorify the killer like some documentaries do.

It's an important production for me as I was in my late teens and mid 20s when this was going on. While the killer preferred gay black men, he would also go after straight men regardless of race when needed. If he sized up the potential victim as straight he would use a picture of a woman to lure them back to his place, stating she wants to have sex but the victim needs to be tied up. The killer would then rape the victim, strangle them, then dump their body in areas across several jurisdictions. Because he did dump sites in so many places, it was initially difficult to pin the murders as a serial.

SFH Sr. was still in law enforcement when this was going on, not a detective, but he would share stuff "out of school" with us at dinner. He also would joke that I need to stop collecting so many weapons and horror movies before I become a suspect.  ???

Anyway its only 87 minutes if you're into serial killers, like I said, it's the only non youtube coverage of this case, for now. I'm actually surprised more hasn't been done on this case, and in fact, the lack of national coverage is touched on in this work.

Offline Harley Quinn

  • Laugh this off... puddin'!
  • Admin
  • Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 16,856
    • Culture Crossfire
Re: It's Real to Me - The Documentary Thread
« Reply #101 on: June 18, 2019, 11:02:17 PM »
Really great little 30 minute documentary done by Roth Cornet about Forks, Washington and the Twilight fandom that sprang up there.


Offline Harley Quinn

  • Laugh this off... puddin'!
  • Admin
  • Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 16,856
    • Culture Crossfire
Re: It's Real to Me - The Documentary Thread
« Reply #102 on: July 06, 2019, 02:48:36 AM »
Watched Bob Lazar: Area 51 & Flying Saucers. The director, Jeremy Corbell, was a horrible fit for this as the documentary focused largely on him and his asking repetitive questions to Lazar largely about aliens/his history of trying to prove this story. I'm very disappointed as Lazar, as a person, and the story itself are incredibly interesting. Unfortunately, the director didn't know how to frame the story of Lazar himself, nevermind how to naturally unfold any interesting thematic story in relation to Lazar's life or his experiences at S4/Area 51. Don't bother with this. 4/10

Offline RedJed

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 4,767
  • Rasslin' Rambler
    • RedJed's Rasslin' Rants - Only on YouTube! The latest in the wild and wacky world of pro wrestling!!
Re: It's Real to Me - The Documentary Thread
« Reply #103 on: July 08, 2019, 01:18:45 AM »
Saw a trio of docs this weekend in theaters....

Echo in the Canyon: Really well done tribute of the Laguna, CA scene in the mid 60s with the uprising of pop music that ended up becoming more rock and roll beginning from the success of the Beatles. This was pretty heavy with cover song performances by Jakob Dylan (who ends up producing, narrating, and interviewing musicians related to this era) but there was some good insight into the scene at the time. It was pretty eye opening to see just how much talent came out of this small So-Cal area.

Framing John Delorian: I guess I was too young at the time to understand and know about the controversy behind this guy, but wow....well worth going out of your way to see this one. I didn't care for the balance of the performances by Alec Baldwin and many others trying to recreate events of his life, but the doc element was tremendous.

Biggest Little Farm: Inspirational doc about the future of farming and self sustainability. Couple uses a 200 acre beaten down area to regrow and build it within many years to gain and understanding of how a naturally sustained area can survive and thrive. There was a large educational element for sure, but this was generally very entertaining too with some focus on some of the animals in the farm. Very touching stuff on a few different kind of levels here.

Offline Saints_Fan_H

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 4,984
Re: It's Real to Me - The Documentary Thread
« Reply #104 on: July 16, 2019, 06:38:01 PM »
Hot Girls Wanted

It's been on my Netflix list for a while, but I never got around to watching it, and now I wish I would have just left it unseen. It's a look into the amateur porn industry and produced by Rashida Jones (someone I adore). What you actually get is a peek into the lives of an "agent" (that's being generous) and his series of duped victims.

He brags about having his own place, camera shots of the house indicate it isn't anything special beyond being "5 bedrooms." He used to be bullied in high school and a dishwasher at Outback but now he's got a new 18 year old on a regular basis working for him and he is his own boss.

He charges the women rent to live in his place and acts as their agent for mostly low end shit. Take out the sex aspect and it is similar to how a lot of lower end indy wrestlers probably lived until getting their break or leaving.

A handful of actresses are followed, my Google searches tell me only one stuck in the field around past a year. There's a few references to "Bell Knox" a more mainstream actress who was also attending Duke University when discovered. Almost immediately the cast begins to talk trash about her, indicating to me a jealousy that was either trained by the "agent" or maybe it was real, I don't know, I'm not a psychologist.

The film was done to demonize an industry and it does that well. If you view pornography with any regularity, there isn't really anything here you don't already know. If you are unfamiliar with the genre, keep in mind the production does not focus on the higher end studios or anyone that made any sort of comfortable living in the field.

ADDED:

It left me feeling gross, not so much as a consumer of the genre, just that people like the "agent" exist. There's parts of the film that are flat out disgusting in how the ''employers'' view the ''talent'' as well as other parts that are just out right disheartening at how the actresses view things. One guy is heard describing a potential actress as "18 but looks 12" and then describes her larger breast size. Another scene the actress discusses the financial stipends of certain acts ($100 for a costar to finish inside of her), the cost of dealing with it (Plan B costs $40 there), and getting to pocket the extra ($60) and being happy about it.

The private life of one actress is highlighted, spending time with her parents and boyfriend. A lot of it was very cringeworthy. Just a weird production.

In the end, I appreciate they wanted to put something out there on a widely consumed medium like Netflix (and wherever else it is available to view) to hopefully warn potential naive people approaching 18 or just over 18 from entering this field blind. I don't know the resources behind the production nor do I know the actual time spent filming. Given that most of the featured people had very short careers, I don't think they filmed at great length. Also, while Googling for more information on the documentary, the "agent" was quoted in one article as seeing an increase in his clients since the production.

So I don't know.


Offline Harley Quinn

  • Laugh this off... puddin'!
  • Admin
  • Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 16,856
    • Culture Crossfire
Re: It's Real to Me - The Documentary Thread
« Reply #105 on: December 19, 2019, 05:32:07 AM »
Watched a couple documentaries on Netflix. First one was related to Henry Lee Lucas and was pretty solid for somebody who knew very little about it all.

I also watched Don't Fuck With Cats: Hunting an Internet Killer which was harrowing (I skipped all the animal vids) and yet fascinating from an online investigative journalist aspect.

Offline jerk of all trades

  • •d•u•b•q•
  • Admin
  • Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 22,143
Re: It's Real to Me - The Documentary Thread
« Reply #106 on: December 20, 2019, 03:55:09 AM »
I also watched Don't Fuck With Cats: Hunting an Internet Killer which was harrowing (I skipped all the animal vids) and yet fascinating from an online investigative journalist aspect.
Also watched this - but only after someone confirmed to me that they do not show the cat/murder videos in their entirety. I wasn't paying much attention to the news when this was going on up here, so to see all laid out like this is interesting. What a supremely fucked up story.

Offline Saints_Fan_H

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 4,984
Re: It's Real to Me - The Documentary Thread
« Reply #107 on: February 16, 2020, 07:25:11 PM »
Knocked out both The Pharmacist and Don't Fuck With Cats over the last 48 hours.

Both were a whirlwind for different reasons but had the same root lesson, when good people are persistent enough, bad people can be brought down. In the midst of it, though, they can definitely come off as unhinged to those around them that are not invested in the cause.


The Pharmacist takes place near where a lot of my friends in the entertainment field live, or the friends I've made knowing those friends. I'm 95% sure I've seen "M" out in the metro area, I just feel like it'd be inappropriate to cross that line by asking around. The young lady used an alias for a reason in this documentary and I'm just going to not touch that with a 16 foot poll.

For me, it was really upsetting because I literally watched the time line of 1990s pain pill mills to doctor's finally cracking down unfold next door to my parents home growing up. Our neighbor was in a wreck in 1990/1, got hooked on God knows what and by the time I was in college in 1999 we would get phone calls asking if we had Vicodin/percoset/etc after surgeries. This went on until she was hooked on morphine and then her death of unrelated. Which is weird to think "thankfully" she didn't die of addiction (but part of our grieving/healing was asking if her body could have fought off the tumor better had she not been dependent on hard opioids). More recent with the fentanyl crisis, as highlighted in the documentary, you, me, everyone knows someone affected by an OD death in 2020. And then to learn that St Bernard was ground zero for this area infuriates me. I'd be interested in how many viewers were able to watch it without having some sort of personal relevance to the story.

Don't Fuck With Cats was interesting in that, man do I love my pets, but they sure did a disservice to the young man that was murdered during this filming. As a whole, it was well done, but I have to point out that this is a very glaring hard criticism for me. Extending the benefit of the doubt, it's possible Jun Lin's family didn't want to be involved.