Author Topic: TRTSM has exquisite taste in Foreign Films.  (Read 1462 times)

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Offline Shooting Star

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TRTSM has exquisite taste in Foreign Films.
« on: March 16, 2010, 07:03:47 PM »
Having just seen Academy Award winning El Secreto de sus Ojos in the Santo Domingo Film Festival, I want to discuss overseas cinema with fellow trsmers. I'll start off with the movie that inspired this thread: The Secret in their Eyes. A masterpiece in every sense of the word. 127 minutes of pure delight. I recommend this movie to anyone who loves the art of cinema.

This argentinian film is about a prosecutor touched by the brutal rape and murder of a 23 year old married woman in Buenos Aires during the period of great political inestability that the country lived during the Presidency of Isabel de Peron. This is not a very political film though it is important to know the reality of Argentina right before National Reorganization Process. Directed by Juan Jose Campanella (Who has directed many episodes of American tv shows like 30 Rock and the Oscar nominated 2001 movie Son of the Bride) and starring Ricardo Darrin (Who was the protagonist in Son of the Bride) and a totally unrecognizable Guillermo Francella.

Any of you seen it? got films you want to recommend?

Offline GAYGENT OF OBLIVION

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TRTSM has exquisite taste in Foreign Films.
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2010, 12:26:27 AM »
If it isn't comic book bullshit no one here gives a fuck.

(effusive praise for Akira Kurosawa)

Offline Incandenza

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« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2010, 12:30:49 AM »
I'll soon be immersing myself in the world of Rainer Werner Fassbinder, most likely starting this weekend. Not literally immersing myself, by the way; I've neither been hooked on cocaine nor homosexuality.

Offline Kinsey

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TRTSM has exquisite taste in Foreign Films.
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2010, 02:06:45 AM »
Herzog is one of my favorite directors ever.


Offline Teenage Mutant King Kamala

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TRTSM has exquisite taste in Foreign Films.
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2010, 02:12:02 AM »
Just saw Wages of Fear for the first time. Excellent stuff.

AoO, if you've got Turner Classic Movies, they're running Kurosawa marathons every Tuesday this month in honor of the 100th anniversary of his birth.

Offline wnyxmcneal

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« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2010, 02:49:08 AM »
I think I'm the current foreign film aficinado, given how many foreign films I see. I've seen 4 in the past week alone.

A Prophet, which I saw yesterday, is great, and well worth checking out. I also really liked The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, though it was too long. The Girl On The Train, I probably liked more than I should've, it felt very French.

Ajami was also pretty good

Offline Gary

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TRTSM has exquisite taste in Foreign Films.
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2010, 02:52:14 AM »
I've really want to see "A Prophet." I wish I had more to add, but oh well.


Out Here Ginding

Offline NoCalMike

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TRTSM has exquisite taste in Foreign Films.
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2010, 04:12:33 AM »
Thirst was cool.
Get your TV Horror Fix w/the Podcast EVIL EPISODES! Listen at:
http://www.legionpodcasts.com/
http://www.horrorphilia.com

Offline Byron The Bulp

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« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2010, 04:18:07 AM »
I'll soon be immersing myself in the world of Rainer Werner Fassbinder, most likely starting this weekend. Not literally immersing myself, by the way; I've neither been hooked on cocaine nor homosexuality.

I've seen Ali: Fear Eats Soul and The Marriage of Maria Braun and was honestly pretty bored by both of them. Maybe my taste isn't refined enough to appreciate art made by sensitive German homosexuals :-/

Also: some kind soul has uploaded all of Godard's Made in USA to YouTube (part one here. the rest is linked from there) I'd recommend checking it out. Seemingly a full third of its running time is comprised of close-ups of Anna Karina, so that's fun. The same dude has also uploaded Detective (1985), but I haven't had a chance to watch it yet. I may report back here when I finally get around to it.

Offline Incandenza

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« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2010, 04:27:00 AM »
Man, I hated Made in USA; I think I went into detail why after I saw it last summer either here or at the other place. Nails-on-chalkboard political wankery and a totally miscast Anna Karina.

Also, Fassbinder wasn't the most sensitive soul. He'd likely punt you one right in the stuff for saying that.

Offline Byron The Bulp

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TRTSM has exquisite taste in Foreign Films.
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2010, 05:39:21 AM »
Man, I hated Made in USA; I think I went into detail why after I saw it last summer either here or at the other place. Nails-on-chalkboard political wankery and a totally miscast Anna Karina.

I thought it was the among the defter of his pre-Maoist 'political' films. La Chinosie and Week End are what I think of when I think of didactic political wankery, to say nothing of the out-and-out activist cinema of the Dziga Vertov Group years. The political stuff in Made in USA is mostly relegated to the speeches on the reel-to-reel tapes, and I think those can just as easily be read as parodies of didactic leftism as they can earnest expressions of it. The whole thing struck me as being more of a postmodern pop art collage than any kind of programmatic political statement.

And I don't know how you can call Karina miscast. All the role really required of her was to stare sphinxlike into the camera, and I think she pulled that off nicely.






Offline CuckBright7831

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TRTSM has exquisite taste in Foreign Films.
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2010, 05:56:35 AM »
I've always enjoyed Japanese cinema. Anything from Akira Kurosawa and Ishiro Honda is good stuff in my book.


HEY, TRTSM:

Quote from: Cowboy Numbers
same with cwm
he's a stay at home dad with no education
what's he gonna teach his kids? how to be a loser?

Offline Incandenza

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« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2010, 06:31:13 AM »
Karina's character was suppose to be some hard livin' detective-type as I recall (it's been several months since I've seen it and I've no interest in revisiting it), and nothing was really believable about that other than the bags under her eyes. She doesn't pass off as the sort, though I'm sure some hardcore Godardian might argue she wasn't supposed to fit the part, man.

Offline Byron The Bulp

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« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2010, 06:58:42 AM »
She wasn't supposed to fit the part, man. The whole joke is that Godard claimed to be remaking The Big Sleep but cast his cute-as-a-button ex-wife in the Bogart role. The performance was just a series of signifiers suggesting 'hard livin' detective-type' which were meant to remain just that: signifiers and gestures. I never got the impression that I, the viewer, was supposed to buy her as a fully fleshed out and believable character. Verfremdungseffekt, etc.

Offline treble

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« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2010, 08:00:39 AM »
I watched 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days about a week ago.  I liked it well enough (the actor playing the abortionist was awesome, the scene with him explaining how the girls are going to have to pay him is tremendous) and the last shot of the film, with the one girl looking straight at the camera, legitimately creeped me out a bit.

Offline Incandenza

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« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2010, 09:34:48 AM »
Byron, given that much of Made in USA has vanished from my memory, I don't have much else to say re: it. However(!), perhaps you can recall the name of the piano piece that plays throughout the film. The same piece also appears during the closing credit sequence of Pierrot le fou.

Offline Byron The Bulp

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Offline wnyxmcneal

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« Reply #17 on: March 17, 2010, 06:17:49 PM »
We can spell out sorry.

I've liked the Japanese cinema I've seen of the past year, though the pace can be very slow. Tokyo Sonata was shaping up to be a good family drama, before the weird turn it took.

Offline Kinsey

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« Reply #18 on: March 18, 2010, 08:23:16 AM »
Has anyone checked out un prophete? Byron, Bob, I'm looking at you guys. It's playing at a theater here in Baltimore the next few days and I'm trying to figure out if its worth going out of my way to see.

Oh, and on French film, The Grand Illusion and le samurai is aces.


Offline wnyxmcneal

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« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2010, 08:28:07 AM »
Read the thread

Offline Jingus

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« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2010, 12:04:45 PM »
I finally caught Breathless.  I didn't think it was as aggressively boring as Band of Outsiders or infuriatingly pretentious as Alphaville, I still just don't get it.  I understand that Godard was criticizing Hollywood movies with it and intentionally breaking all the established rules about how you're supposed to film something and yadda yadda yadda.  Sure, at the time that jagged new style of filmmaking must have been shocking.  But that was fifty years ago, and I can't wave a magic wand and un-see it without 2010 eyes.  Frankly, at times I wonder if elements like the handheld camera and jump cuts weren't forced onto the movie due to its microscopic budget, rather than an intentional stylistic choice; especially considering the old story about how Godard literally scribbled out every day's script the morning before the shoot.  (EDIT: upon doing a bit of research, that turns out to be exactly the case, they were doing these innovative new techniques simply because they didn't have the money to pay for the old traditional ones.)  I did quite like Seberg's character, a weird bony pile of contradicting eccentricities, found her kinda fascinating.  She's got one of those faces which ya just want to stare at, for no clear reason; not because she's beautiful (she is, but that ain't the point) but because she just looks different and interesting.  But I didn't see the oft-proclaimed greatness in Belmondo's performance, and the rest of the movie in general didn't engage me at all.  Didn't annoy the shit out of me like the previously mentioned films either, that's a plus, but still. 

(And oh yeah, reading her review of the movie reminded me of how violently I often disagree with Pauline Kael.  She literally spent half the article rambling about random shit which had no connection whatsoever to the film, and generally came off like a nervous old woman bemoaning the state of today's youth.  At least Ebert's Great Movies essay made coherent sense, even if I still don't see the reason why the film was so influential.) 

I'll eventually go subject myself to more Godard sometime, if nothing else to be informed in the arguments I'll invariably get into one day when I dare to speak his name in a less than penitent fashion whilst among some film snobs.  But how much more do I need to see?  Pierrot le fou is apparently a big favorite among many.  I have vague memories of loving Week End when I saw it a decade ago, so I wouldn't mind giving that one a rewatch.  And the subject matter of Contempt seems at least mildly interesting.  Aside from that, is there anything else which is technically considered a must-see? 

Offline spiny norman

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« Reply #21 on: March 27, 2010, 06:37:14 PM »
I'll eventually go subject myself to more Godard sometime, if nothing else to be informed in the arguments I'll invariably get into one day when I dare to speak his name in a less than penitent fashion whilst among some film snobs.  But how much more do I need to see?  Pierrot le fou is apparently a big favorite among many.  I have vague memories of loving Week End when I saw it a decade ago, so I wouldn't mind giving that one a rewatch.  And the subject matter of Contempt seems at least mildly interesting.  Aside from that, is there anything else which is technically considered a must-see? 

I find Godard almost always annoyingly pretentious, but at his best there's just so much that's wonderful going on that it doesn't bother me in the slightest. Pierrot le fou, Week End and Contempt would all make my top five of his films, along with Alphaville (which you didn't like, I see, sadly) and Vivre Sa Vie. I strongly recommend it, it probably had Anna Karina at her most gorgeous.

Offline Shooting Star

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« Reply #22 on: March 27, 2010, 09:49:48 PM »
I recommend Satanas which is a Colombian film about a psychopath who went on a murder spree. I know my sypnosis of it doesn't sound too interesting but it is a pretty good film.

Offline Incandenza

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« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2010, 02:51:15 AM »
Belmondo's performance in Breathless isn't great in the sense, say, Marlon Brando in Last Tango in Paris is great. Rather, he helped establish a cool new style and form for films and film characters to follow—much like the French New Wave in general and Breathless in particular. It's iconic.

I was 20 or so when I first saw Breathless; I was as taken with Belmondo's Michel Poiccard as much as many other "hip" young people were. He represented the kind of suave anti-hero I all too readily admired. Stylishly dressed but in the way of making it appear second nature, capable of picking up the hottest women (in spite, let's face it, of not being conventionally good-looking), and one of the few people who made smoking look like the coolest thing you can do. It wasn't until revisiting the film after a period of several years that I realized what an egotistical asshole Michel is. Not an unsymapthetic one, mind you, but still a prick.

Offline Incandenza

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« Reply #24 on: May 26, 2010, 04:35:07 AM »
Caps from the Blu-Ray edition of Shohei Imamura's Profound Desires of the Gods, coming next month from the UK-based Masters of Cinema label. (MoC is kind of an English version of the Criterion Collection, though there's very little overlap between the two.)

I don't care if I'm the only person on this board that gives a damn about this release, but holy moly those stills are so gorgeous I had to share.

Offline Psycho Penguin

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TRTSM has exquisite taste in Foreign Films.
« Reply #25 on: May 26, 2010, 10:50:01 AM »
My 2 favorite films are both foreign: Tell No One, a thriller about a doctor whose wife is murdered and six years later gets a video and he's convinced she's not dead, but the police think he killed her. and Spoorloos, a movie about a woman that vanishes and her boyfriend goes on TV begging to find out what happened to her.. the kidnapper agrees, but only if he suffers the same fate she did. Great stuff.

Offline wnyxmcneal

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« Reply #26 on: May 26, 2010, 04:22:05 PM »
I should update the thread, as I've seen a ton of foreign films recently.

Still haven't Secret In The Eyes (next Tuesday, I promise), but I loved Mid August Lunch